What does Kutz mean in PA Dutch?

What does Kutz mean in Dutch?

Kutz (Kuts, Kuz, Coots) is a German surname with several origins. Some time ago it was considered that this word is derived from the Middle High German word “kötze” or “kütze”, which means a woven basket (Tragekorb) or a kind of a coarse woolen garment (Oberkleid).

What does Nix Nootz mean?

• Nix nootz: A devilish, mischievous person. “Our daughter is a little nix nootz.”

Where does Pennsylvania Dutch English originate?

The Pennsylvania Dutch are descendants of early German-speaking immigrants who arrived in Pennsylvania in the 1700s and 1800s to escape religious persecution in Europe. They were made of up German Reformed, Mennonite, Lutheran, Moravian and other religious groups and came from areas within the Holy Roman Empire.

What does Kot stand for?

KOT

Acronym Definition
KOT Keep on Talking
KOT Keep on Tryin’
KOT Keep on Track
KOT Kitchen Order Ticket (hotel industry)

Are Amish of Dutch descent?

While most Amish and Old Order Mennonites are of Swiss ancestry, nearly all speak Pennsylvania Dutch, an American language that developed in rural areas of southeastern and central Pennsylvania during the 18th century.

What does Ferhoodled mean?

verb (used with object), fer·hoo·dled, fer·hoo·dling. Chiefly Pennsylvania German Area. to confuse or mix up: Don’t ferhoodle the things in that drawer.

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Are Pennsylvania Dutch really German?

The Pennsylvania Dutch (also called Pennsylvania Germans or Pennsylvania Deutsch) are descendants of early German immigrants to Pennsylvania who arrived in droves, mostly before 1800, to escape religious persecution in Europe.

Were the Pennsylvania Dutch Amish?

History of the Pennsylvania Dutch

They were made of up German Reformed, Mennonite, Lutheran, Moravian and other religious groups and came from areas within the Holy Roman Empire. … The most famous groups who still adhere to those beliefs are the Amish and the Mennonites.

How do you say you’re welcome in Pennsylvania Dutch?

Gaern gscheh. (You’re welcome.)